It’s Time to End Political Endorsements

The Globe & Mail has demonstrated convincingly why political endorsements should be abandoned as a thing of the past.

I have to feel a little bit sad and embarrassed for the Globe & Mail. Their endorsement of the Conservatives for federal re-election while calling for Stephen Harper’s resignation has been rightly met with ridicule. That they somehow suppose the sycophants and yes-men left behind can run the country better than anyone else shows a surprising lack of imagination from our paper of record.

The Globe & Mail has inexplicably endorsed the Harper Conservatives while saying Harper himself should step down.
The Globe & Mail has inexplicably endorsed the Harper Conservatives while saying Harper himself should step down.

This is not the first time a Globe & Mail endorsement has raised eyebrows. Their support for Stephen Harper’s government in 2011 as “moderate and pragmatic” ignored ample evidence to the contrary that compounded over the next four years. Their backing of Tim Hudak for premier of Ontario – he who promised to fire 100,000 government workers and create 1,000,000 new private sector jobs – after calling his party “barely” viable, was peculiar to say the least. It later emerged that their Editorial Board’s decision to endorse a minority Liberal government was overruled at the last second by Editor-in-Chief David Walmsley.

This begs the question: Why do news media endorse political parties? Newspapers should be holding truth to power, not acting as king-makers. Is the public well-served by endorsements? Are they better informed? Anyone following the Globe & Mail over the past few years would surely conclude not.